Check your Hausa Names And Their Meanings

Hausa Native Names And Their Meanings

Hausa people in parts of Niger Republic, Northern Nigeria, Sudan, Ghana and others are known with fond of representing names of prophets and prophets companions, then their particular native names as backup, making it second or third names. This traditional naming is more privalent to the ruralship or township Hausas, in exemption to their urbanised counterparts which some take as being gravely unletterd, not knowing that numbers of the names they are contemplating to be of Arabian origin are not Arabic. Names like Nuhu (Noah), Ibrahim(Abraham), Idris(Enoch), Dauda, Dawud
(David), Imran, Isah(Jesus), Samu(Samuel), Hana(Hannah), Yunusa(Jonah) e.t.c are not Arabic names and they don’t have meanings in Arabic language; The present Arabians describe the names by saying name of such prophet of God, but in Hausa, numbers have meanings, being that Hausa is one of ancient african civilisations that dwelled in the Middle East in those days, according to hausa analysts.
Hausa native names are given to new born children or people after their birth, situations surrounding their birth, their numbers in a family and peoples roles in a society after they had grown-up. In hausa culture, the names are referred to as grandparents names “Sunayen kakanni” who are always the leaders in every hausa family. Any hausa speaker can grasp meaning of the names by mention, because they have deep hausa language roots and showcased hausa way of life. The names are still being maintained by various Hausa subgroups like; Gobirawas, Tagamawas, Adarawas, Kurfayawas, Cidarawas, Arawas, Daurawas, Kanawas, Kabawas, Katsinawas, Ranawas, Hadejawas, Zazzagawas, Zamfarawas e.t.c
Those who are ambassadors of their families, villages, towns and states add its name in their names e.g Bashir Adamu Gobir, Abubakar Ibrahim Gobir, Aminu Yahayya Sokoto, Nuhu Gobir, Alhaji Adam Rano, Bashir Abubakar Katsina, Malam Kabiru Daura, e.t.c
Hausa Male Native Names:
Bizo: This name is given to a male child who was born in a family after his successors are dying. According to the tradition surrounding this name, a child born in such an afformentioned situation is taken to a hip-dump to appease the spirits, and luckily those children are fortunate to stay alive and be named “Bizo”, an hausa word for dump. Those who were not taken to the dump are called “Barau”, after the saying “A barshi a gani ko ya tsaya- leave him and watch if he would live.”
Dawo, Dandawo: A male child who was born when his mother was pounding millet delicacy used in preparing Hura.
Arzika: A male child whose mother undergoes severe child labour before he was eventually given to birth.
Dawi, Maidawa: A male child who was born in a season when his father harvested plentiful bundles of Guinea-corn.
Gerau, Maigero: A male child who was born in a season when his father harvested aboundant bondles of Millet stalks.
Maiwake: A male child who was born in a season when his father harvested lot of beans.
Shekarau: A baby who make a year in his mothers womb.
Ruwa, Anaruwa,
Makau, Makao: A male child who was born when it was raining cat and dog in a community.
Hankurau: A husband who was extreme patient in a community.
Shibkau: A male who was born during sowwing season.
Nomau: A male who was born during farming season.
Sarki: One who has King name. A male child who bore kings name in a kingdom.
Maifari or Maihwari: A male child who was born during drought season.
Yarima: Prince. A male child who bore respected prince name in a kingdom.
Nagona, Nanoma: A male child who was born at farm.
Bako: A male child who was born after arrival of visitors in a household.
Bara: A first male child who was born after his siblings are all females. Bara in hausa means to beg i.e they begged him out.
Hana: A male child who was born in a family while they are mourning death of a family member.
Bawa: A male child who was brought-up by another woman, that was not his mother.
Tunau: Can be called “Tuni” meaning remembering birth. A male child who was born after his mother took long time before she concieve another pregnancy.
Maikasuwa: A trader or a merchant.
Kasu, kasuwa: A male child who was born at market or on market day.
Tanko: A brother to female children in a family.
Abara, Abarshi,
Barau: A remaining son who was born after his successors are dying.
Dangali: An only son in a family.
Jika: Grandson to a person. A person who bore someones grandchild name.
Babba: A big-brother to one or elder brother.
Kane: Younger brother to one.
Maikudi: A rich one or wealthy.
Madugu: A male child who was born during travel or born in the process of travelling.
Kaka: A person who bore someones grandparents names.
Tawaye: Brother to a twin.
Gambo: Brother to twins.
Kokari: A person who was hardworking in a community.
Adare: A male child who was born at night.
Fari or Hwari, Jatau: A person who was fair in complexion.
Baki, Duna: One who was black in complexion.
Nahantsi or hantsi: A male child who was born at dawn.
Gambo: Brother or sister to twins.
Agada: Brother or sister of twins.
Dada: A son who was born of relative couples.
Kulau: A most loved male child in a family.
Nagoma: A tenth male child in a family.
Bakwai: A seventh male child in a family.
Auta: Last born in a family.
Jigo: Leader. An only son born in the mist of sisters, so he is their leader.
Karami: Thin man or younger one.
Guntau: Short man.
Jariri: One who was extreme thin at time of birth.
Ango: A male child who was born during marriage ceremony in a household or family.
Korau: One who was born when his mother was divorced.
Ɗari, ‘Dari: One who was born during excess cold.
Kadaɗe, Kadad’e: A male child who was born after his parents have been baren for years before he was eventually born.
Babangida: This name is given to a child who bears same name with grandfather in a family and because in-laws are shy to directly call the child by his normal name, they nickname him “Babangida”, master of the household.
Mailafiya or Mailahiya: A person who was calm and easygoing with people in a community.
Hausa Female Native Names:
Shekara: A female child who make a year in her mothers womb before she was given to birth.
Daɗe, Dad’e: A female child who was born after her parents has been baren for years.
Gimbiya: Princess. A girl who bore princess name in a kingdom.
Sarauniya: Queen: A girl who bore queens name in a kingdom.
Kyawo: Name given to a girl who was so beautiful in a community. A girl or woman who was object of discussion during her youth days.
Mata: Wife. A female that bore someones wife name.
Tanoma: A female that was born during farming season.
Uwani: My mother. A female child that bore someones mothers name.
Kadada: A daughter born of related couples.
Fara or Hwara: A female who was fair in complexion.
Abarta: A female child that was born after her siblings had all died.
Gwamma: A female born that was born after her second to third siblings are female children in a family. It meant better one than never.
Hakuri: A wife who was extreme patient with people in a community.
Kyauta: Gift, only son or daughter that remains after their siblings are dying.
Rabo, Raboci: Share, only son or daughter that a mother born.
Tsakani: A middle birth in a family.
Araga: A remaining daughter in a househod after her siblings are passing away.
Yada: A female that was born after passing away of siblings but with a tradition. Similar with bizos.
Tadaka: A female that was born during pounding.
Tanoma: A female that was born during farming.
Yatsohi: A daughter born to old parents.
Delu, Dela, Kando: First daughter born in a family of three to four male children. A sister to three to four male siblings.
Hana: A female child that was born when her family were mourning death of a family member.
Samu: A female child who was born after her parents has long been waiting for childbirth.
Bakuwa: Guest. A female child that was born after arrival of visitors in a family. They beliefs is that she come along with the visitors.
Kuluwa: A daughter who was most loved in a family and many others.

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